Using Medium Gel To Create Image Transfers On Fabric – Part Four

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someoneTweet about this on Twitter

Who would believe there are so many ways of creating transfers using medium gel! Well I’m definitely having fun exploring them, so much so I think it’s worth continuing to share them. The method I’m sharing in this post is using images printed on paper and transferring them onto fabric. The general rule is to use photocopies or laser jet prints. I have always been one to break the rules and as I only have access to a photocopier or inkjet printer I decided to use some of my inkjet prints. I found they work just as well, you have to be careful when rubbing off the paper to not remove the image, but it does work.

Once you have chose an image select some fabric and cut to size, make sure it is larger than the image you want to use. I used a disappearing pen to mark where I wanted the image to go, not necessary but it does insure you don’t put medium where it’s not needed.

Prepared fabric & Image

Prepared fabric & Image

I secure the fabric with masking tape, not too much as it can be difficult to take off. Then apply a generous but even layer of medium, I make sure it’s thick enough to still see but not so thick that I can’t see the fabric through it.

Fabric with medium applied

Fabric with medium applied

Once you are happy with the amount of medium applied place your image face down on the fabric & medium. Be careful not to slide the image as it will cause it to smudge.

Applied Image

Applied Image

Once applied you need to gently burnish the image with your finger or a spoon to make sure all of the image is in contact with the fabric. If there are any air bubbles, no matter how small the image won’t take.

Burnishing the image

Burnishing the image

Now come the part which tests your patience. You have to wait until the image is completely dry before revealing the image, if you try to remove the paper to soon the image will also come away. Once dry, I dip the fabric in water quickly then lie it flat and gently rub with a sponge or my fingers to remove the paper and watch the image reveal itself, again, be careful when rubbing that you don’t remove the image as well. I like the effect of some of the image being removed.

Removing the paper

Removing the paper

If paper fibers reappear when the fabric is dry, carefully wet the area and gently rub  with your finger you will feel the paper lift away. I rinse under a tap quickly to take away any residual paper but don’t over rinse.

Once the image is dry you can incorporate it in artwork or leave it as it is both approaches are beautiful. Below is the image dried and waiting for me to decide what to do with it.

Finished transfer waiting to be used

Finished transfer waiting to be used

I hope you have a go at some of these techniques and explore use of different surfaces as I intend to.

Let me know what you think or what you would like to hear about